Show Me That Horizon

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I hate, I miss, and I love

I hate how everything seems like nothing has changed however, in reality everything has changed. I hate the hollow friendships and the mask we all wear. I hate the fact there is a wall between us now. I hate the awkward silence we sometimes have. I hate how nothing is like the past anymore.

i’ve had tumblr for years and i still don’t know what the fuck an rss feed is

Create a Feedly account, subscribe to blogs/news site that you read often.
Don’t have to check each one separately. All new content will be on your Feedly account.

You’re welcome.

(Source: thr-ill, via disco-bandit)

krisjener:

can we talk about the lyrics in lorde’s song 400 lux???

image

????

Long sleeves = night time
OJ = gives a better hit

(Source: krispymeme, via disco-bandit)

insertreviews:

ZeniMax's The Elder Scrolls: Online is something slightly unusual. It’s almost everything we know and love about the series backing the ambitious MMO instalment, yet the game feels so distant that one cannot help but look at the production without raising an eyebrow here and there.
The Elder Scrolls series establishes varying themes based on the theme song produced for each title. Since Morrowind, the theme has shared a similar orchestration and each title afterwards has varied only slightly to produce its own sense of mystery, adventure and war. It’s fair to say that the music and original sound tracks has become something of a big factor for the RPG series as it boasts supreme character immersion through NPC interactions and quest lines, character creation and class customisation. Without the auditory aids the Elder Scrolls series would certainly lack a lot of the value needed to sell such a powerhouse of a game. Likened towards that of a movie, a great soundtrack conjures emotion and a sense of grandeur. The installation of the choir for TESV: Skyrim gives off the impressions of coming war and the rise of a warrior.
However, although several of the titles of the series hold the themes of war, TESV: Skyrim uses driving percussion in triplet rhythms to accompany lush strings and really bring those themes to life. Walking into a tavern reveals swords for hire and bards seeking requests.
ESO is somewhat a bit detached in that sense. The music feels generic, and forces multiple elements of previous titles into its theme song. The choir no longer feels unique, and is almost lost beneath the over eccentric drum patterns and extremely shy brass instruments. Nothing seems to stand out. ESO is trying too hard to be something it already is. With the incorporation of so many elements, and maintaining a central theme, it forgets to breathe and add new artistic flare and innovation. 
These flaws eventually find their way into other elements of the game, and whilst still in beta, these flaws are major components that would require large amounts of resources to fix.
ESO retains the exact same tutorial layout as its predecessors give or take a few alterations.
Plot and character progression remains the same, and the added MMO element only bores the player even further with seemingly pointless quest lines.
BGM, like most MMORPGs on the market sounds manufactured and the sense of adventure isn’t as strong as TESV: Skyrim.
ESO is still an Elder Scrolls game. It’s still a great game. The mechanics are smooth and as the game nears retail release, much of the interface will be tweaked and numerous bugs fixed. Social systems are up to date with existing MMORPG’s and support classes excel in their roles whilst also being able to retain some fun when playing solo.
Crafting has had a dramatic change. Classes and races are given their own unique armour sets and really drives the unique aspect of character creation and adds a sense of identity to the online game - a concept that is only gained through buying cash shop items and wearing unique clothing sets in most MMORPG’s. Socketing gems and other items into armour provides another level of customisation, however finding these materials to keep up with other players can become tedious and time consuming for new players who might not have the knowledge or money to purchase the said items. In saying that, the need to learn and master crafting additional races armour and clothing sets allows for a more defined approach to the crafting skill and allows for true blacksmiths and clothiers to really specialise in their craft.
As a package, ESO has potential. As an instalment to the series, ESO certainly has a lot to offer in terms of lore and history but it definitely has a long way to go to feel like an Elder Scrolls game. Creating an MMO adaptation of an already well-established series is difficult, and very risky. Whilst a lot of resources has been funnelled into preserving what makes an Elder Scrolls game, an Elder Scrolls game, and whilst it’s a good job done, it’s not quite good enough.

insertreviews:

ZeniMax's The Elder Scrolls: Online is something slightly unusual. It’s almost everything we know and love about the series backing the ambitious MMO instalment, yet the game feels so distant that one cannot help but look at the production without raising an eyebrow here and there.

The Elder Scrolls series establishes varying themes based on the theme song produced for each title. Since Morrowind, the theme has shared a similar orchestration and each title afterwards has varied only slightly to produce its own sense of mystery, adventure and war. It’s fair to say that the music and original sound tracks has become something of a big factor for the RPG series as it boasts supreme character immersion through NPC interactions and quest lines, character creation and class customisation. Without the auditory aids the Elder Scrolls series would certainly lack a lot of the value needed to sell such a powerhouse of a game. Likened towards that of a movie, a great soundtrack conjures emotion and a sense of grandeur. The installation of the choir for TESV: Skyrim gives off the impressions of coming war and the rise of a warrior.

However, although several of the titles of the series hold the themes of war, TESV: Skyrim uses driving percussion in triplet rhythms to accompany lush strings and really bring those themes to life. Walking into a tavern reveals swords for hire and bards seeking requests.

ESO is somewhat a bit detached in that sense. The music feels generic, and forces multiple elements of previous titles into its theme song. The choir no longer feels unique, and is almost lost beneath the over eccentric drum patterns and extremely shy brass instruments. Nothing seems to stand out. ESO is trying too hard to be something it already is. With the incorporation of so many elements, and maintaining a central theme, it forgets to breathe and add new artistic flare and innovation. 

These flaws eventually find their way into other elements of the game, and whilst still in beta, these flaws are major components that would require large amounts of resources to fix.

  1. ESO retains the exact same tutorial layout as its predecessors give or take a few alterations.
  2. Plot and character progression remains the same, and the added MMO element only bores the player even further with seemingly pointless quest lines.
  3. BGM, like most MMORPGs on the market sounds manufactured and the sense of adventure isn’t as strong as TESV: Skyrim.

ESO is still an Elder Scrolls game. It’s still a great game. The mechanics are smooth and as the game nears retail release, much of the interface will be tweaked and numerous bugs fixed. Social systems are up to date with existing MMORPG’s and support classes excel in their roles whilst also being able to retain some fun when playing solo.

Crafting has had a dramatic change. Classes and races are given their own unique armour sets and really drives the unique aspect of character creation and adds a sense of identity to the online game - a concept that is only gained through buying cash shop items and wearing unique clothing sets in most MMORPG’s. Socketing gems and other items into armour provides another level of customisation, however finding these materials to keep up with other players can become tedious and time consuming for new players who might not have the knowledge or money to purchase the said items. In saying that, the need to learn and master crafting additional races armour and clothing sets allows for a more defined approach to the crafting skill and allows for true blacksmiths and clothiers to really specialise in their craft.

As a package, ESO has potential. As an instalment to the series, ESO certainly has a lot to offer in terms of lore and history but it definitely has a long way to go to feel like an Elder Scrolls game. Creating an MMO adaptation of an already well-established series is difficult, and very risky. Whilst a lot of resources has been funnelled into preserving what makes an Elder Scrolls game, an Elder Scrolls game, and whilst it’s a good job done, it’s not quite good enough.

insertreviews:

Jason Oda’s indie development Continue?9876543210 has sparked up quite a stir within the gaming community. Its largest criticisms suggest that the game is pretentious and tries too hard to be “artsy”. However Continue? doesn’t try anything, it simply achieves. Continue?, although not officially stated, comes across as a direct sequel to the developers previous game SkrillexQuest.

Both games share a similar character design, dungeon layout and themes of death and existentialism.

Continue? is not a game with achievements, nor is it very rewarding to play. There is no real test of skill, however there is a lasting effect of melancholy and abstract introspection towards death. The game cannot be played once, nor can a complete conclusion be drawn from just a single run through. With a random set of characters and levels to play through, each player is given the opportunity to create their own interpretations of the themes portrayed in the game.

In a way, the game, much like life, is not about living but rather, it is about the approaching inevitability that is death. The game is unforgiving; death comes quickly and without mercy. Players are given a short amount of time in which to attempt to prolong their lives, and although it gives no chance of survival, it buys times to contemplate, explore and "hopefully be at peace with the inevitability of your death" (Oda, 2013).

The dialogue’s romantic character is profound and non-linear. NPC’s offer a variety of lore within each level. If it weren’t for the impending death facing the character, you’d want to talk to every NPC to gain an understanding of the world they live in. The Wild Shores of Love was indeed one of the most romantically poetic levels. The dialogue matched the blue hues and lighting schemes engineered a sense of innocence lost. Like all the levels, there is a consistent theme and a clear purpose; love, culture, war and second chances all relate back to the notions of inevitability.

Continue? has a way with linking the death of a fictional character to real life events. Oda’s own near death experience translates into the game through NPC dialogue and character monologues. Who’s to say that during our final moments we wouldn’t give a prayer to a deity or higher body, asking for salvation and protection? Continue? touches our childhood and our deepest fears.

This is a critique, not a review, however if you’ve read a review on Continue? as it’s been out for some time, then I feel sorry for you. The whole point of the game is to not know what’s happening. There is much more enjoyment in finding things out for yourself. The less you know, the more of a connection there is between you playing the game and the character dangling on the strings of death; in our final moments we don’t know what to do, we can run around, flail our arms in the air but in the end, we’re scared of the unknown.

Continue? is something poetic, something memorable. It does not boast to be the pinnacle of gameplay and graphics, nor does it try to be something it’s not. If you were to take the poetic literacy of Mary Shelley and combined it with a sublime art style that changes to suit the level design and moods of that given level, then the result would be Continue?9876543210Conintue? is not a game meant for speed running or achievement hunters - there is a clear audience target and if poetic observation and romantic literature is something of an enjoyment, then Continue?9876543210 will offer something very rewarding.

my lightening. my prayer.

sigh

sigh

One time I had a bad dream and I never woke up from it and whenever I do things I’m afraid time will fleet past me so I try to sit silently so that I can wake up from that bad dream but I never do so I sit patiently waiting to wake up from this bad dream.

Cutting The Apex

cuttingtheapex:

Tumblr! Cutting The Apex has officially been launched. 

Cutting The Apex is about an arrogant man who’s selfishness robs him of the only thing close to him.


Hit “like” to see special updates and artwork (no spam, I promise :D)

Cutting The Apex is my graduate film and it would mean the world to me if you showed your support by spreading the word around.
Cutting The Apex thumbnail

(Source: )

artimex:

pinsir:

andrewcentrism:

nikkidoughnuts:

88floors:

The Cube desktop 3D home printer by 3D Systems

Putting this on the Xmas list!

MASS MARKETED 3D PRINTING IS HAPPENING.

I REPEAT, MASS MARKETED 3D PRINTING IS HAPPENING.

Print your own naked anime characters

ABLE TO PRINT LITTLE COSPLAY PROPS AND GADGETS AND ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES

And then you find out you have to know how to do 3D modelling…

(via disco-bandit)

Makes a cheeky flirtatious comment to cute girl on facebook, doesn’t get sent and conversation continues. Scumbag technology,